Note the trends because your next crisis could be mobile


EMA colleague Rob Rayfield generated a WOW! snapshot of how information continues to migrate. Many years ago it started leaving print in all forms for the web. Social media emerged and sped up that transition. Now the web is watching as mobile grows.

Getting a handle on this is something like figuring out how to land a satellite on Mars, catching a solar flare or explaining the Higgs boson [though Christopher Buckley turned in my favorite effort on that little devil.] That’s where Rob’s snapshots help.

Here’s what he found, from a variety of sources. Statistics are easily manipulated, of course, but if you face a crisis and don’t consider either communicating via mobile, or understanding its use, your crisis is going to hurt you more than it needs to. Ignore this, as they say, at your peril.

Here are his findings:

It took Japan’s most popular social network, mixi, 4.5 years to shift from 14% mobile traffic to 85% mobile traffic. (source)

At the start of 2009, 13% of Facebook’s users reached it on mobile (20 million mobile, 150 million total). Just over 2.5 years later, more than 50% of its 901 million monthly users access Facebook on mobile devices. (source)

Seventy percent of Pandora’s traffic came from mobile devices in March 2012. In June 2011, it was 40%. In October 2011, 52%. (source)

The Weather Channel registered 1.1 billion online page views in October 2011 and 1.3 billion page views on mobile devices. (source)

Approximately 40% of all searches on Yelp came from mobile devices in March 2012. (source)

Fifteen percent of all YouTube consumption is via mobile devices (source)

Crisis or not, what you hold in your hand these days is a lot more than your future.

The content of this blog is about crisis management and mismanagement in a digital age. It originates with Steve Bell, who spent 30 years as a journalist for the Associated Press and in four top editor positions at The Buffalo News. He is now Partner/Director of Public Affairs at Eric Mower + Associates, one of the nation’s largest independent advertising, integrated marketing and public relations agencies, with seven offices in the Northeast and Southeast. Learn more about EMA at www.mower.com. Steve’s blog is based on his own opinions and does not represent the views or positions of Eric Mower + Associates.

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About steveoncrisis

The content is about crisis management and mismanagement in a digital age. It comes from Steve Bell, who spent 30 years as a journalist for the Associated Press and as managing editor and editorial page editor at The Buffalo News. He is now Partner/Director of Public Affairs at Eric Mower and Associates, one of the nation's largest independent advertising, integrated marketing and public relations agency with six offices in the Northeast and Southeast.
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